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  1. When it comes to providing aid, developing innovations, and making bold steps that change the course of history, the United States is usually on the front lines.
  2. You can’t stop wars to build tertiary teaching hospitals, but you can say, ‘Let’s stop for a couple of days to immunise the kids.’ It has been done.
  3. Now, you might think of flu as just a really bad cold, but it can be a death sentence. Every year, 36,000 people in the United States die of seasonal flu. In the developing world, the data is much sketchier, but the death toll is almost certainly higher.
  4. The virus that causes AIDS is the trickiest pathogen scientists have ever confronted. It mutates furiously, it has decoys to evade the immune system, it attacks the very cells that are trying to fight it, and it quickly hides itself in your genome.
  5. In large part, thanks to widespread immunization, the number of young children dying each year has declined significantly, from approximately 14 million in 1979 to slightly less than eight million in 2010.
  6. Historically, industrial revolutions haven’t been kind to poor people. Despite the potential benefits technology can offer, the immediate impact on the lowest-paid members of society has often been negative.
  7. Yellow fever outbreaks are not uncommon. But, as with other infectious diseases, when they occur in urban areas, they can play out very differently — not least in terms of the speed and scale at which they can spread.
  8. The World Economic Forum Annual Meeting is the perfect place for a dialogue that brings together industry, civil society, U.N. agencies, and countries around a shared response to the challenge of protecting children against vaccine-preventable illness.
  9. I love science, and I believe in it. I have a faith that science can solve problems and make the world a better place.
  10. We know that children who are healthier do not require medical treatment or care, both of which cost time and money. So, by avoiding illness, infants have a greater chance of growing into healthier children who are able to attend school and become more productive members of society.
  11. You’d see little shallow graves, lined up, one after the other — babies. That’s what happens when measles goes through a nutritionally deficient community. It’s a horrible disease, and it spreads incredibly efficiently.
  12. The return on investment in global health is tremendous, and the biggest bang for the buck comes from vaccines. Vaccines are among the most successful and cost-effective health investments in history.
  13. If you want to know the value of vaccines, just spend some time in a clinic in Africa. The faces of the mothers and fathers say it all: vaccines prevent illness and save lives.
  14. I wish we could have state-of-the-art hospitals in every corner of the earth… but realistically, it’s going to be a while before that can happen. But we can immunise every kid on earth, and we can prevent these diseases. It’s only a matter of political will, a little bit of money and some systems to do it.
  15. In an increasingly complex world, we have a simple and bold vision that all children should have the opportunity to grow up healthy.
  16. As megacities like Mexico City and Lagos become increasingly common, we could see a rise of the urban epidemic and a new era of infectious disease threatening global health security.
  17. Finding innovative ways to deliver vaccines to children in developing countries is at the heart of our work. The very fact that we don’t have people on the ground but rather work in an alliance with other organizations is itself an innovation that was the basis of GAVI’s establishment in 2000.
  18. GAVI works collaboratively with the private sector — from investment banks to vaccine suppliers to corporations to members of the Forbes 400 — to find new and better ways to raise and apply resources and broaden the base of participants in global health.
  19. More people living in less space can put greater strain on already limited sanitation resources, and this can create a fertile breeding ground for waterborne infectious disease and the insects spreading them.
  20. Without strong health systems in place, the higher the population density, the more difficult it becomes to prevent and control outbreaks, and not just because of the increased risk of contagion.

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